1903 Daimler 14 HP Tonneau Tourer AP 221

In 1899, the Daimler Company had introduced its first four-cylinder car, and by 1903 the previously wide range had been reduced to two main models, the 14hp and 22hp.  Both were fitted with a four-speed gearbox, a new feature for this season, while final drive was still by chain.  The engines followed contemporary practice, with two blocks of two cylinders each, but Daimler favoured side-by-side valves (the so-called ‘L’ head) instead of valves on opposite sides of the engine (‘T’ head).

Both the models were available with a choice of wheelbase lengths, and different types of standard bodywork, ranging from a two-seater through the Tonneau and Phaeton models – both four/five-seater open touring cars – to formal limousines.  A 14hp chassis cost £690, and complete cars were offered at £750.  The larger 22hp model was £300 more expensive.

The radiator had now acquired what was to become the Daimler hallmark, the finned water tank, although in 1903 there were actually two water tanks, fitted either side of the radiator.  In 1904, there was a single water tank on top of the radiator, and what had originally been cooling fins eventually become the purely symbolic flutes which adorn Daimler radiator grilles to this day. Another characteristic Daimler feature was the curved dashboard, seen on this car. The body is a replica of the contemporary rear entrance Tonneau; this body was constructed for this car in 2001.

Daimler was now well established as the favoured supplier of cars to His Majesty King Edward VII.  During 1903 his son HRH The Prince of Wales, later King George V, followed this example by taking delivery of two Daimler cars, both 22hp models.  Many other members of the aristocracy also bought Daimlers, including the Spanish Duke of Santo Mauro who had a 22hp racing model with a special light two-seater body on a short chassis.

Registration Mark: AP 221

Chassis Number: 2090

Owner: The Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust

Inventory Number: 5/D.04